Employers – Drop the Millennial Clichés

Millennials have invaded the workforce. Any blog might have you thinking Gen-Y’s constant need for feedback, acclaim and a sense of meaning should have employers expecting to work with entirely different animals altogether – even snakes.

In an industry where a third of employees fall between the ages of 20 and 34, entertainment recruiters are having to grapple with the job market’s influx of youth. But is that the chore pundits and experts are making it out to be? No. In fact, this topical “insight” into the psyche of a millennial employee is replete with stereotypes and myths, and believing them might cheat employers – those in entertainment and otherwise – out of bringing on the market’s most talented employees.

Here are just a few myths about Millennials recruiters need to avoid:

Myth: They’ll Swap Good Pay for Meaning and Purpose

Reality: As altruistic as some studies would have you believe the younger generation is, a vast majority still value the benefits of a having solid paycheck. Often employees translate salary into how much an employer values them, so be sure that the monetary offer is accompanied by what you believe the new employee will add to your company and the position.

Myth: They’re Job-Hoppers

Reality: Sure, some are – just like many Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers were before them. But treating any employee like they’re always looking to leave will make them feel unwanted and more likely to do so. That puts employers in a constant cycle of having to search for talent.

Myth: They’re Seeking “Ideal” Work-Life Balance

Reality: It may come as a surprise, but many young people enjoy working, especially when they feel like their work is valued and when they are working as part of a team. No one likes to work 80 hours weeks, but many are willing to put in the extra time, especially if it’s only every now and then.

The Next Generation Might Not Be as Different as the Last…

It’s understandable why today’s young job seekers may seem foreign – there was a time when the establishment balked at Elvis, The Beatles and Nirvana too. But for employers, fitting an entire generation into a stereotype does nothing but distance them from the value their younger workers have to offer.

Are you a Gen-Yer? Put an end to the myths surrounding you by applying for the hottest entertainment jobs on the market. If you’re not, you can still find a great career in the entertainment industry.

Millennials have invaded the workforce. Any blog might have you thinking Gen-Y’s constant need for feedback, acclaim and a sense of meaning should have employers expecting to work with entirely different animals altogether – even snakes.

In an industry where a third of employees fall between the ages of 20 and 34, entertainment recruiters are having to grapple with the job market’s influx of youth. But is that the chore pundits and experts are making it out to be? No. In fact, this topical “insight” into the psyche of a millennial employee is replete with stereotypes and myths, and believing them might cheat employers – those in entertainment and otherwise – out of bringing on the market’s most talented employees.

Here are just a few myths about Millennials recruiters need to avoid:

Myth: They’ll Swap Good Pay for Meaning and Purpose

Reality: As altruistic as some studies would have you believe the younger generation is, a vast majority still value the benefits of a having solid paycheck. Often employees translate salary into how much an employer values them, so be sure that the monetary offer is accompanied by what you believe the new employee will add to your company and the position.

Myth: They’re Job-Hoppers

Reality: Sure, some are – just like many Gen-Xers and Baby Boomers were before them. But treating any employee like they’re always looking to leave will make them feel unwanted and more likely to do so. That puts employers in a constant cycle of having to search for talent.

Myth: They’re Seeking “Ideal” Work-Life Balance

Reality: It may come as a surprise, but many young people enjoy working, especially when they feel like their work is valued and when they are working as part of a team. No one likes to work 80 hours weeks, but many are willing to put in the extra time, especially if it’s only every now and then.

The Next Generation Might Not Be as Different as the Last…

It’s understandable why today’s young job seekers may seem foreign – there was a time when the establishment balked at Elvis, The Beatles and Nirvana too. But for employers, fitting an entire generation into a stereotype does nothing but distance them from the value their younger workers have to offer.

Are you a Gen-Yer? Put an end to the myths surrounding you by applying for the hottest entertainment jobs on the market. If you’re not, you can still find a great career in the entertainment industry.

Powered by Mango Blog. Design and Icons by N.Design Studio